RSS

Tag Archives: Civil War

Johann Gottfried Haufler (John G. Haufler)

Johann Gottfried Haufler_optOn 1 February 1864 John Haufler enlisted in the First Regiment of the Texas Cavalry. John lived in Kendall County and was a Union sympathizer in a Confederate state. His muster and descriptive roll dated 22 July 1864 in Brownsville states he was born in Wurttemberg, Germany and was 38 years old and a farmer. According to this muster roll, he enlisted in Kendall County for a 3 year period.  How can you enlist in the Union Army if you are residing in a Confederate state? So perhaps “enlisted in Kendall County” means he was from Kendall County? The date of enlistment was 1 February 1864. John was described as blue-eyed with light hair and a fair complexion.  He stood 5 feet 6 inches tall. John was a private and assigned to Company C. Adolph Zoeller, his neighbor, was the captain.

While in Brownsville, John wrote home to his wife, Louise, and 5 children. One letter dated 27 August 1864 survives and was translated from German script to English by Penelope Borchers, Helen Dietert, and Herbert Reitsamer. He writes from Camp at Brazos Santiago that on the 17th of August “we had a fairly heavy firefight for 4 to 5 hours. We were, with reinforcements, 50 men. I had the outpost that fine morning, with three men…A group of 6 men gave us fire, but we gave them a good answer with our bullets. A bullet of theirs, just missing by a hair, almost stretched my horse out on the sand. It was quiet for about 2 hours. Then they came back in columns, about 200 to 300 men… We were in the same old heavy firefight for four hours. Bullets were buzzing by my ears like bees.”

In the last paragraph he says, “Do not be afraid if you don’t hear from me, as the opportunity to write does not come often. Once again, greetings to you, my beloved Louise. Greetings to all friends. I believe we will meet again, all hale and hearty. Your loving husband John Haufler.”

John mustered out in San Antonio 31 October 1865 and returned to his home and family in Kendall County.

Because I am a descendant of John Haufler who is a Union veteran I was able to join the Daughters of Union Veterans.  The Clara Barton Detached Tent #3 of DUV meets in San Antonio four times a year.  If you are descendant of John Haufler, you can apply and join a DUV tent. There are always interesting speakers and a delicious lunch.

Haufler, John.  Photograph of the original held by Harold Haufler family. Digital copy privately held by Kathryn Adam-Hurst. Boerne.

“John Haufler Civil War Union Muster Rolls Texas”  Fold 3. http://www.fold3.com : 2012.

Kiel, Frank Wilson. “Wir waren unser 20 Mann gegen 150” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, January, 2002, 464-470p.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 15, 2013 in Haufler, Kendall County

 

Tags: , ,

150th Anniversary of the Battle of the Nueces

This weekend Comfort, Texas, is remembering Union soldiers from the Texas Hill County who died in the Battle of the Nueces on 10 August 10 1862. These men were Union sympanthizers in a Confederate State. They were on their way to Mexico and were camped beside the Nueces River when Confederate forces attacked them.

On 10 August 1866 the Treue der Union Monument was erected as a memorial to these soldiers and a place for their remains to be laid to rest. It wasn’t until after the war that family members were able to make the journey to the Nueces to gather their bones and return them to the Hill Country.

These men died on 10 August 1862:  Leopold Bauer, Edward Degener, C. Schafer, F. Behrens, Pablo Diaz, L. Schierholz, E. Beseler, F. Vater, H. Steves, Ludwig Borner, A. Schriener, W. Telgmann, A. Bruns, J. G. Kalenberg, M. Weirich, Heinrich Degener, H. Markwart, H. Weyerhausen

These men escaped but were later captured and killed: W. Borner, H. Flick, L Rubsamen, T. Bruckish, F. Tays, A. Rubsamen, C. Bock, A. Luckenbach, H. Stieler

These men were killed on 18 October 1862 along the Rio Grande River: J. Elstner, Peter Bonnet, M. Weisz, E. Felsing, V. Hohmann, F. Weisz, H. Herrmann, Fritz Lange

The Handbook of Texas states, “It is the only German-language monument to the Union in the South where the remains of those killed in battle are buried, and where an 1866 thirty-six star American flag flies at half-staff.”

 

“NUECES, BATTLE OF THE,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/qfn01), accessed August 11, 2012. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

150th Anniversary of the Civil War Battle and Massacre at the Nueces River August 10th 1862. Commemoration Program for Events August 10th and 11th, 2012.

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 11, 2012 in Kendall County

 

Tags: , ,

Paul and Kathinka Adam Toepperwein

Kathinka, the eldest daughter of Conrad and Adalbertha Bergmann Adam, was born on 7 September 1857. Her great-grandson, Marion Toepperwein, told this story about her. “Before her marriage while living at her father’s place near Boerne, Texas. Due to no fences, horses had to be hobbled, a band of Indians rode through scattering the horses. Indians were still wild and would steal cattle and kill white people. Kathinka had just unhobbled one horse and was able to ride back to the farm house in time to escape the Indians.” Can you image how scary that would be?

On 30 December 1875, she married Paul Johannes Toepperwein. Kathinka and Paul lived in Leon Springs until 1882 when they purchased property four miles south of Boerne. They sold the farm after living there thirty years and purchased a smaller farm. In 1919, they purchased a house in Boerne.

Paul and Kathinka had six children: Albert Paul born in 1877, Edwin born in 1882, Ella Clara born in 1884, married Willie Stein, and Wally Bertha born in 1889, married Adolph Wendler, Rudolph Herbert born in 1892, married Alma Pearl Alexander, and one son died as an infant.

Paul was born in Germany on 17 February 1844 to Ferdinand Lucian and Marie Elizabeth Toepperwein. The family settled ten miles east of Fredericksburg on Grape Creek where his father taught school. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted in the Confederate Army and was assigned to the regiment band. His brother Herman was the band leader. Paul played the trombone in the band but could play several other instruments. He died 11 July 1929.

Kathinka died in 10 June 1943. Her obituary in the Boerne Star stated, “She was a very good hearted and fine old lady, mother, grandmother and great grandmother, everyone she came in contact with she had a kind and good word for and of course had very many dear friends.”

” Mrs. Kathinka Toepperwein,” obituary, The Boerne Star (Boerne, Texas), 17 June 1943.

Toepperwein, Marion. “Paul Toepperwein.” 1980s.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 7, 2012 in Adam, Toepperwein

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Conrad Adam in the Civil War

Conrad Adam

Once the Civil War was in full swing, every male from age 18 to 45 was required to register. As the war progressed and more men left home, the Indians began to raid more frequently. In December, 1863 an act of the 10th Texas Legislature divided the state into districts and mustered men to help protect the frontier. In March of 1864, Conrad Adam was 37 years old and enlisted with the Company for the 3rd Front. The commanding officer was Capt. William E. Jones who reported to Brigadier General J. D. McAdoo. I’m not sure how much action the company saw but they were prepared.  Conrad served from March 1 to June 1, 1864 for a total of 23 days.  He was paid $46.00 for his service but had to pay .50 for 1 powder horn, so he actually received $45.50. At the time of enlistment, he had 1 pistol, 1 shotgun, and 1 rifle. He was listed on the muster roll as Cornelius Adam but he signed for his wages as Conrad Adam. Thank goodness, otherwise I wouldn’t have been sure it was him.  Heinrich Dietert, his brother-in-law, served with him.

I have often wondered if Conrad was a strong supporter of the Confederacy. Many of the Texas Hill Country Germans were very upset about being part of the Confederacy. When they arrived in Texas it was part of the United States and that’s where their loyalty lay.  The area was in turmoil for a number of years with the lynching of German Union supporters in Fredericksburg and a massacre of Union German men from Comfort. It seems Conrad’s focus was in protecting his friends, family, and home from the raiding bands of Indians, so I guess I have my answer.

Conrad’s picture was taken well after the Civil War, but I just love those wide lapels. Reminds me of the 1970s, don’t you think?

“Kendall County Muster Roll February 1864.” Confederate Card File. The Archives Library, Texas State Library, Austin, Texas.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 22, 2011 in Adam, Kendall County

 

Tags: , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 34 other followers