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52 Ancestors – #13: Marie Peters Bauer, My Great-Great Grandmother

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Marie Peters Bauer

Marie Peters traveled from Prussia to New Braunfels with her parents in the 1850s. I heard a story about Marie a number of years ago. She knew Philipp Bauer in Prussia. He must have lived in the same area as her family. Once she arrived in New Braunfels she wrote and told him to come to Texas. He took her advice and on 19 August 1855 they married in New Braunfels, Comal County, Texas. G. W. Eisenlohr a minister of the Gospel performed the ceremony.

Marie and Philipp had five children Bertha, Otto, Louise married Carl Wessley, Ernest married Rosa Bender, and Emma married Henry Schuetz.

She is buried in the Kreutzberg Cemetery in Kendall County. Her tombstone states,

Hier Rubet

Marie Bauer

Geb. Dien

20Ten Aug. 1827

Gest. Dien

13Ten Maerz 1905

77 yahr 7 monat

 

Comal County, Texas, marriage certificate No. 122 (1855), Bauer-Peters; Comal County Court House,New Braunfels.

 
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Posted by on March 29, 2014 in 52 Ancestors Challenge, Bauer

 

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Sentimental Sunday: Willie Adam’s Birthday

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Lillie and Willie Adam

Happy Birthday, Grandpa!

 
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Posted by on March 23, 2014 in Adam, Sentimental Sunday

 

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52 Ancestors – #12: Maria Margarethe Held Schütz, Vigorous for her Age

When Connie Schneider Krause graciously shared her translation of the obituary of Maria Margarethe Hild Schuetz with me I was so excited! I knew so very little about this grandmother who came from Nassau in 1845. One time I asked my Grandma Lillie if she had any memories of her great- grandmother. She would have died when Grandma was about nine years old. She had a very vivid memory. Grandma told me her great-grandmother always wore an apron with a pocket. Whenever the grandchildren came around she would reach into her pocket and bring out a piece of hard candy for each child.

Maria Margarethe was born 6 December 1807 in Langenbach which was located in the Province of Hacheburg in Nassau (Germany). About 1838 she married Ludwig Schütz. She was almost seven years older than him according to their tombstone dates. Her obituary states “she shared 54 years in a happy marriage.”

In 1845 Ludwig, Maria, and two small sons, Carl, age 7, and Louis (Ludwig Jr?) made the journey to Texas aboard the Bark Harriet with 28 other families and a total of 175 passengers. They sailed from Antwerp on 31st of October and arrived in Texas around the 31st of December. The ship was traveling under the auspices of the Adelsverein and were headed to New Braunfels, a German colony in the Republic of Texas. With all the hardships they had to face just traveling from Nassau to Texas, Maria Margarethe still faced another hardship. Her granddaughter Annie Schuetz Saunders said Louis died during the voyage and was buried at sea. Another fact I found in a one paragraph biography about Ludwig, on file at the Sophienburg Museum and Archives in New Braunfels, was a baby girl was born to them in Galveston but did not survive. Her obituary does not make any mention of these hardships but there is one sentence which tells about this time in her life.  “On December 27, they landed in Galveston and then from there they went to Indianola where they stayed about 8 days and saw much sickness and had pity for all the suffering occurring there.”

Maria Margarethe had a total of six children, three living to adulthood, Carl my, great-great grandfather, Theodore “Dora” born in 1847, and  Wilhelm born in 1853.

She died at the ripe age of 96 years and 11 months on 4 November 1904. This is my favorite quote from her obituary “The deceased was vigorous for her age; she could still read and do needlework without glasses. She was respected and loved by all those that knew her.” She sounds delightful!

Thank you Connie Schneider Krause for translating and sharing this obituary with me.

“Maria Margarethe Hild Schuetz.” obituary. New Braunfelser Zeitung (New Braunfels), 17 November 1904, sect. C, p 4; translated from German by Connie Schneider Krause.

“Ludwig Schuetz” Sophienburg Museum and Archives, New Braunfels, Texas.

Personal Interview. Annie Schuetz Saunders, 1970.

Personal Interview. Lille Schuetz Adam, 1970.

 
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Posted by on March 21, 2014 in 52 Ancestors Challenge, Schuetz

 

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52 Ancestors – #11: Henry Schuetz and the Census

Every day online records are being transcribed by volunteers to help family researchers. This saves time for the researcher and is very helpful when searching for ancestors who moved around a lot. The handwriting on many of the documents is difficult to read.  Looking at census records for my great-grandfather, Henry Schuetz, I found several spelling variations of his last name. When his father Carl came from Germany, he spelled his last name Schütz.  Just to illustrate how difficult the handwriting can be, here are the spellings I found for his name from the transcribed census records from 1940 to 1870. Name spellings can make researching your family interesting and challenging! The e and u caused a little trouble for the transcribers.

  • 1940 Schuetz
  • 1930 Sch?Tz
  • 1920 Schultz
  • 1910 Schultz
  • 1900 Schuetz
  • 1880 Shute (actual spelling on census)
  • 1870 Scheetz (on census Schutz)

So what did I find out about Henry from the census records? He was the second oldest son of Charles (Carl) and Catharina Schütz and was born in Texas. In 1870, the family lived in Precinct No. 1 in Blanco County, Texas.

Schutz1, 1870 census

In 1880, the Schutz family is living in Precinct No. 4 in Blanco County. Henry is 16 and a farm laborer along with his older brother Willie. There are now 10 children in the family.

Schuetz1, 1880 census

By 1900 he is married to Emma, is 36 years old, was born in December 1863, a farmer, still living in Precinct No. 4 in Blanco County and has three children, Alex, Lillie, and Harry. Henry and Emma have been married for 11 years.

In 1910 he is 45 and has been married for 20 years. The family speaks English. He has three living children out of four and is a self-employed farmer. His father Charley is living with them. He is 71 years old and widowed. The family has moved and are living in Precinct #3 in Kendall County.

Schuetz11910excerptcensus

In 1920 Henry is 55, owns his farm and ranch. His youngest son, Harry, is the only child living at home with him and his wife Emma. Harry’s occupation is farm helper. They are living in Precinct #1 in Kendall County and all three can read and write.

In 1930 Henry is widowed and 65. Harry, a World War veteran, is living with him in Precinct #1 in Kendall County.

In 1940 Henry is 75, owns his farm, had 4 years of elementary schooling, and is a farmer “working on his own account.” His son Harry, age 41, is living with him. In 1935 they were living at the same address. The week before the census was taken both had worked 48 hours on the farm and in 1939 they each worked 52 weeks. Harry had 6 years of schooling and is a farmer.

Despite the name variations, I found quite a bit of information about Henry Schuetz.

Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 1, Blanco, Texas; Roll: M593_1576; Page: 354A; Image: 13; Family History Library Film: 553075.

Year: 1880; Census Place: Precinct 4, Blanco, Texas; Roll: 1291; Family History Film: 1255291; Page: 353D; Enumeration District: 026.

Year: 1900; Census Place: Justice Precinct 4, Blanco, Texas; Roll: 1612; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 0008; FHL microfilm: 1241612

Year: 1910; Census Place: Justice Precinct 3, Kendall, Texas; Roll: T624_1570; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 0159; FHL microfilm: 1375583.

Year: 1920; Census Place: Justice Precinct 1, Kendall, Texas; Roll: T625_1821; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 167; Image: 461.

Year: 1930; Census Place: Precinct 1, Kendall, Texas; Roll: 2364; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 0002; Image: 459.0; FHL microfilm: 2342098.

Year: 1940; Census Place: , Kendall, Texas; Roll: T627_4086; Page: 11B; Enumeration District: 130-2.

 
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Posted by on March 14, 2014 in 52 Ancestors Challenge, Schuetz

 

52 Ancestors – #10: You go Girl! Emma Bauer Schuetz

In 1978 I found a voter registration receipt for my great-grandmother, Emma Bauer Schuetz. At the time, I made a copy for my files and then never really looked it again. As I was going through a folder today, I ran across the copy and read it and noticed the date was 5 July 1918. Whoa, I thought 1920 was the date women started voting. I immediately went to my go-to site about Texas, The Texas Handbook Online.  I learned in March 1918 a bill was introduced that would allow women to vote in the Texas primaries. It passed in the House, the Senate and was signed by Governor William P. Hobby. Emma, a 50-year-old housewife from Kendalia, Texas and daughter of immigrant parents, stepped right up and registered to vote. She was in tune with her times. You go girl! The first Democratic primary was held on 26 July 1918. I wonder who she voted for…

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Registration Receipt

State of Texas, County of Kendall                                    No. 16

I, Emma Schuetz, of Kendall County, Texas, am 50 years of age; Color White, Race American Occupation Housewife

Residence no. Kendalia, Voting Precinct No. 3, P.O. Address Kendalia, Have lived at said place 9 years.

Signed Emma Schuetz

Sworn to and subscribed before me this day 5 day of July 1918  

Joe Saunders, Tax Collector, Kendall County

I, Joe Saunders, Tax Collector aforesaid, hereby certify that the foregoing registrant personally signed and swore to the facts set out in the above receipt before me, showing her to be a qualified voter in primary election in said county, state and precinct for the year 1918.

Joe Saunders, Tax Collector, Kendall County

A. Elizabeth Taylor,            “WOMAN SUFFRAGE,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/viw01), accessed March 05, 2014. Uploaded on August 31, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

“Emma Schuetz” Kendall County Texas Voter Registration Receipt. No. 16, 5 July 1918.

 
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Posted by on March 7, 2014 in 52 Ancestors Challenge, Bauer, Schuetz

 

Sentimental Sunday: Paul Jones Richardson

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Paul Jones “Pop” Richardson, Deputy, Sidney Edge, Sheriff, Ernst Nagel, Deputy

Picture taken in front of the Kendall County Jail

Kendall County Sheriff Department circa 1940s

 

52 Ancestors – # 9: Donut Sundays, Ida Haufler Adam

“She made the best doughnuts!” is the comment I have most often heard about my Great-Grandma Ida Adam. Her grandchildren and neighbors living in the Balcones Community have commented about those donuts on many occasions. They are always wishing they could have just one more. Sunday afternoon coffee klatch was her usual time to share this tasty treat. Bob Clines, the youngest grandchild describe them as, “wonderful confections that would rise out of the bubbling lard in a roasting pan so light they seemed to me to float above the grease. Turned at the right time and placed at the side of the roasting pan on cookie racks to be dusted with granulated sugar. First she made the regular doughnuts and then the final miracle the jelly filled ones, always last because you could ruin the grease if the jelly leaked out of its doughy cover. Then they sat above the cooking surface of the wood stove in the two warming ovens.” All the family passed through the house on Sunday afternoons and neighbors would frequently find their way there. Allan Stahl said as a young boy he couldn’t get enough of those donuts and would just happen to stop by when she was making them. My father, Jimmie, said the kids ate the donut holes first and then the donut. I just wonder how many dozens she made and if I ever ate one.

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Ida and Julius Adam

Jimmie said she made delicious food and if the wind was blowing in the right direction you could smell what she was cooking. As a young boy he would run to her house when the smell of baking cookies was in the air.  Another of her specialties was Koch Kase. Bob Clines said, “She made Koch Kase by separating the whey from the milk and drying it for a week in cheesecloth then heating the dry curd with a little salt and baking soda. It would spread on bread like butter” She canned fruit, made sauerkraut, baked bread, pies, cobblers, and cakes. Cousin Bob remembers she made German Coffee Cake with strudel on top at Thanksgiving and her devil’s food cake was out of this world. The family agreed she always had something delicious to eat when they came to visit.

Ida was the seventh child out of 13 children born to Johann Gottfried and Louise Magers Haufler. She liked to tell stories and unfortunately I was too young to remember them. Her stories were about growing up in Kendall County and her family. One story has stayed in my memory. She said she was out with one of her sisters near their family home. There was a snake and her sister didn’t see it until it was too late. It bit her. Grandma Ida acting quickly sucked out the poison and got her back to the house as fast as she could. Their father immediately put her on a horse and they rode to the nearest doctor.  Ida said the horse was ridden so hard and fast that it collapsed at the doctor’s house.  Her sister survived.

After she married Julius Adam in 1890 and moved to the Balcones Community, she wrote letters to keep in touch with her brothers and sisters who lived in other parts of Kendall County. They regularly correspondended with each other and always wrote in German.

She moved from the family home in 1959 to the Golden Age Nursing Home in Boerne.  She remained there until her death on Mother’s Day, 10 May 1964.

Adam, Jimmie, Personal Interview, 2012.

Clines, Robert “Bob.” Letter dated 17 Feb 2012.

 
 
 
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