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Category Archives: Haufler

52 Ancestors – # 9: Donut Sundays, Ida Haufler Adam

“She made the best doughnuts!” is the comment I have most often heard about my Great-Grandma Ida Adam. Her grandchildren and neighbors living in the Balcones Community have commented about those donuts on many occasions. They are always wishing they could have just one more. Sunday afternoon coffee klatch was her usual time to share this tasty treat. Bob Clines, the youngest grandchild describe them as, “wonderful confections that would rise out of the bubbling lard in a roasting pan so light they seemed to me to float above the grease. Turned at the right time and placed at the side of the roasting pan on cookie racks to be dusted with granulated sugar. First she made the regular doughnuts and then the final miracle the jelly filled ones, always last because you could ruin the grease if the jelly leaked out of its doughy cover. Then they sat above the cooking surface of the wood stove in the two warming ovens.” All the family passed through the house on Sunday afternoons and neighbors would frequently find their way there. Allan Stahl said as a young boy he couldn’t get enough of those donuts and would just happen to stop by when she was making them. My father, Jimmie, said the kids ate the donut holes first and then the donut. I just wonder how many dozens she made and if I ever ate one.

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Ida and Julius Adam

Jimmie said she made delicious food and if the wind was blowing in the right direction you could smell what she was cooking. As a young boy he would run to her house when the smell of baking cookies was in the air.  Another of her specialties was Koch Kase. Bob Clines said, “She made Koch Kase by separating the whey from the milk and drying it for a week in cheesecloth then heating the dry curd with a little salt and baking soda. It would spread on bread like butter” She canned fruit, made sauerkraut, baked bread, pies, cobblers, and cakes. Cousin Bob remembers she made German Coffee Cake with strudel on top at Thanksgiving and her devil’s food cake was out of this world. The family agreed she always had something delicious to eat when they came to visit.

Ida was the seventh child out of 13 children born to Johann Gottfried and Louise Magers Haufler. She liked to tell stories and unfortunately I was too young to remember them. Her stories were about growing up in Kendall County and her family. One story has stayed in my memory. She said she was out with one of her sisters near their family home. There was a snake and her sister didn’t see it until it was too late. It bit her. Grandma Ida acting quickly sucked out the poison and got her back to the house as fast as she could. Their father immediately put her on a horse and they rode to the nearest doctor.  Ida said the horse was ridden so hard and fast that it collapsed at the doctor’s house.  Her sister survived.

After she married Julius Adam in 1890 and moved to the Balcones Community, she wrote letters to keep in touch with her brothers and sisters who lived in other parts of Kendall County. They regularly correspondended with each other and always wrote in German.

She moved from the family home in 1959 to the Golden Age Nursing Home in Boerne.  She remained there until her death on Mother’s Day, 10 May 1964.

Adam, Jimmie, Personal Interview, 2012.

Clines, Robert “Bob.” Letter dated 17 Feb 2012.

 
 

Johann Gottfried Haufler (John G. Haufler)

Johann Gottfried Haufler_optOn 1 February 1864 John Haufler enlisted in the First Regiment of the Texas Cavalry. John lived in Kendall County and was a Union sympathizer in a Confederate state. His muster and descriptive roll dated 22 July 1864 in Brownsville states he was born in Wurttemberg, Germany and was 38 years old and a farmer. According to this muster roll, he enlisted in Kendall County for a 3 year period.  How can you enlist in the Union Army if you are residing in a Confederate state? So perhaps “enlisted in Kendall County” means he was from Kendall County? The date of enlistment was 1 February 1864. John was described as blue-eyed with light hair and a fair complexion.  He stood 5 feet 6 inches tall. John was a private and assigned to Company C. Adolph Zoeller, his neighbor, was the captain.

While in Brownsville, John wrote home to his wife, Louise, and 5 children. One letter dated 27 August 1864 survives and was translated from German script to English by Penelope Borchers, Helen Dietert, and Herbert Reitsamer. He writes from Camp at Brazos Santiago that on the 17th of August “we had a fairly heavy firefight for 4 to 5 hours. We were, with reinforcements, 50 men. I had the outpost that fine morning, with three men…A group of 6 men gave us fire, but we gave them a good answer with our bullets. A bullet of theirs, just missing by a hair, almost stretched my horse out on the sand. It was quiet for about 2 hours. Then they came back in columns, about 200 to 300 men… We were in the same old heavy firefight for four hours. Bullets were buzzing by my ears like bees.”

In the last paragraph he says, “Do not be afraid if you don’t hear from me, as the opportunity to write does not come often. Once again, greetings to you, my beloved Louise. Greetings to all friends. I believe we will meet again, all hale and hearty. Your loving husband John Haufler.”

John mustered out in San Antonio 31 October 1865 and returned to his home and family in Kendall County.

Because I am a descendant of John Haufler who is a Union veteran I was able to join the Daughters of Union Veterans.  The Clara Barton Detached Tent #3 of DUV meets in San Antonio four times a year.  If you are descendant of John Haufler, you can apply and join a DUV tent. There are always interesting speakers and a delicious lunch.

Haufler, John.  Photograph of the original held by Harold Haufler family. Digital copy privately held by Kathryn Adam-Hurst. Boerne.

“John Haufler Civil War Union Muster Rolls Texas”  Fold 3. http://www.fold3.com : 2012.

Kiel, Frank Wilson. “Wir waren unser 20 Mann gegen 150” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, January, 2002, 464-470p.

 
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Posted by on November 15, 2013 in Haufler, Kendall County

 

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Louise Magers Haufler

Haufler, Louise Magers_opt

On the 1860 census of Comal County, Texas, Louise Magers Haufler stated she was born in Hanover and was 24 years old. Living with her and her husband, Gottfried otherwise known as John, she has two children, one year old Emma and four month old Marie (Anna). Also residing with the Haufler family is Charlotte Magers age 8.

Louise is the daughter of Heinrich and Wilhelmina Luersen Magers and was born on 24 September 1835. In 1855, she immigrated to Texas with her parents and brothers and sisters and they settled in the New Braunfels area.  On 8 November 1857, she married Joh. Gottfried Haufler. They were married by Pastor Moezle (?) of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Smithson’s Valley, Comal County, Texas.

By the mid 1860s the Haufler family had relocated to Kendall County and by 1864 three more children had been added to the family, Gustav, Bertha, and Louise. Her husband, a man of strong conviction, enlisted in the First Regiment of the Texas Calvary which was part of Union forces.  Many Germans from the Comfort area had been killed at the Nueces River while on their way to join Union forces in August 1862 so the times were very dangerous for a German with Union sympathies.  The Civil War was difficult for everyone but once John left to join forces in Brownsville, Louise was at home with five small children ranging in ages of six to a few months old.  John wrote home from Camp at Brazos Santiago and tells Louise “I hope you and the children are not suffering great misery. Sell as much as you have to, but keep the wagon as long as you can.” I can’t imagine how difficult this was for Louise.

Gottfried and Louise had a total of thirteen children: Emma  born 1858, Anna  born 1860, Gustav born 1861, Bertha born 1863, Louise born 1864, Albert born 1866, Ernst born 1868, Carl born 1870, Ida born 1871, Clara born 1873, Alvina born 1875, Lena born 1876, Alma born 1878.

In 1884 Gottfried and Louise built a large two-story rock house two miles east of Waring in Kendall County. The next year on 15 May Gottfried drowned while crossing the Guadalupe River.  He was 54 years old and was buried near the house in Waring. Louise died 29 December 1899 at the age of 64 and is buried next to him.

Kiel, Frank Wilson. “Wir waren unser 20 Mann gegen 150” Southwestern Historical Quarterly, January, 2002, 464-470p.

Haufler, Louise.  Photograph of the original held by Doris Koenig family. Digital copy privately held by Kathryn Adam-Hurst. Boerne.

Texas. Comal County. Marriage Records, County Clerks Office, New Braunfels, Texas, V. B, p 95.

Texas. Comal County. 1860 U. S. Census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication. Washington, D.C.: national Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

 
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Posted by on November 13, 2013 in Haufler

 

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Tombstone Tuesday: Johann Gottfried and Louise Magers Haufler

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Johann Gottfried Haufler                                         Louise Magers Haufler

5 September 1830                                                    24 September 1835

15 May 1886                                                              29 December 1899

Parents of Ida Haufler Adam

(Waring, Kendall County, Texas). Johann and Louise Haufler marker; personally read 1971.

 
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Posted by on November 12, 2013 in Cemeteries, Haufler, Tombstone Tuesday

 

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Tombstone Tuesday: Willie and Lillie Schuetz Adam

Lillie  K.                                  Willie E.

Sept. 8, 1895                             Mar. 23, 1893

Mar. 16, 1975                            July 10, 1955

Willie Eugene is the son of Julius and Ida Haufler Adam

Lillie Katherine is the daughter of Henry and Emma Bauer Schuetz

(Boerne, Kendall County, Texas). Willie E. and Lillie K. Adam marker; personally read 2011.

 
 

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Tombstone Tuesday: Julius and Ida Haufler Adam

Tombstone of Julius and Ida Haufler Adam

Ida Haufler Adam was the daughter of Johann (John) Gottfried and Louisa Magers Haufler.

born September 25, 1871

died May 10, 1964

Julius Adam was the son of Conrad and Adalbertha Bergmann Adam

born March 15, 1864

died August 23, 1952

They are my great-grandparents.

Boerne Cemetery (Boerne, Kendall County, Texas). Julius and Ida Adam marker; personally read 2011.

 
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Posted by on January 17, 2012 in Adam, Haufler, Tombstone Tuesday

 

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A Blessed Union: Conrad and Adalbertha Bergmann Adam

Conrad Adam Family

Conrad and Adalbertha had seven children with six living to adulthood.

  • Kathinka born 7 September 1857 married Paul. J. F. Toepperwein
  • Therese born 20 August 1859 married Frederick Voges
  • Emilie born 27 April 1862 married William Schoenert
  • Julius Conrad born 15 March 1864 married Ida Haufler
  • Bertha born 8 July 1865 married Hilmar G. Froebel (1) Haby (2)
  • Emma born 11 September 1867 married Christian Herms
  • Amalie born in 1869 lived for 7 days or a few years; the stories vary

I don’t think Amalie had a tombstone but there was a small cemetery within walking distance of the house. When my father was a young boy he was told there was a baby buried in the cemetery. They did not purchase the land until 1874, so I am not sure Amalie is buried there.

Don’t you just love this picture?  I wish it was clearer but you can still see Julius next to his sister Kathinka. He doesn’t look too happy. Conrad and Adalbertha are in the middle and Therese is holding Emilie. I am guessing Bertha and Emma were too small and would not hold still for the picture.

 
 

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